Hearing in the Environment

Directions:
Select the BEST response alternative for each of the questions below.


1. The azimuth is the:
A) distance between the sound and the ears.
B) location of the sound in space.
C) angle of a sound source on the horizontal plane relative to a point in the center of the head between the ears.
D) idea that the ears receive slightly different inputs when the sound source is located to one side or the other.
E) difference in time between a sound arriving at one ear versus the other.
2. The ________ is the relay station in the brain stem where inputs from both ears contribute to the detection of interaural time differences.
A) medial superior olive
B) cochlea
C) pons
D) lateral superior olive
E) frontal lobe
3. Which of the following methods of sound localization between the two ears is used most often for tones of very high frequencies?
A) Interaural time differences.
B) Interaural level differences.
C) Interaural frequency differences.
D) Interaural echo differences.
E) Both (a) and (b) equally.
4. The ________ is a relay station in the brain stem where inputs from both ears contribute to the detection of interaural level differences.
A) medial superior olive
B) cochlea
C) pons
D) lateral superior olive
E) hypothalamus
5. Neurons that are sensitive to intensity differences between the two ears can be found in the:
A) medial superior olives.
B) lateral superior olives.
C) brain stem.
D) cochlear muscles.
E) ossicles.
6. The region of positions in space where all the sounds produce the same time and level (intensity) differences is called:
A) the cochlear region.
B) a sound source.
C) the cone of confusion.
D) the medial region.
E) azimuth.
7. Even if the lowest frequency of a harmonic sound is removed, listeners still hear the pitch of this:
A) timbre.
B) missing fundamental.
C) vibration.
D) attack.
E) chord.
8. The complex quality of sound that lets us distinguish a note played on the piano from the same note played on a trumpet is called:
A) consonance.
B) dissonance.
C) attack.
D) decay.
E) timbre.
9. The part of a sound during which amplitude increases is known as:
A) decay.
B) start note.
C) attack.
D) octave.
E) pitch.
10. The part of a sound during which amplitude decreases is known as:
A) instrumental decrease.
B) sound decline.
C) end note.
D) decay.
E) tone.
11. Source segregation involves the:
A) distinction of various harmonic sounds.
B) tuning to one particular sound.
C) combination of various harmonic sounds into one.
D) distinction of auditory events in the broader environment.
E) missing fundamental.
12. A process by which missing or degraded acoustic signals are perceptually replaced is called:
A) perceptual restoration.
B) good continuation.
C) appropriate grouping rule.
D) perceptual filling.
E) auditory stream segregation.


End of Quiz!

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The correct answers are marked by a "C" in the box before each question. The incorrect questions are marked by an "X".